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3CPO

Start date:
Historic
End date:
April 2007
Co-ordinated by:
NHS Lothian

A randomised controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) vs non invasive ventilation (NIV) vs standard therapy for acute pulmonary odema (ACPO)

 

Aim

To determine whether non invasive ventilation reduces mortality and whether there are important differences in outcome associated with the method of treatment (CPAP or NIPPV).

Trial Design

Multi centre randomised controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) vs non invasive ventilation (NIV) vs standard therapy for acute pulmonary odema (ACPO)

List of Publications – references

A Gray, S Goodacre, D Newby, M Masson, F Sampson and J Nicholl on behalf of the 3CPO triallists. Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema. New England Journal of Medicine. (2008);359:24-33.

A Gray, S Goodacre, D Newby, M Masson, F Sampson and J Nicholl on behalf of the 3CPO triallists. Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema. Health Technology Assessment. (2009);13(33).

A Gray, S Goodacre, J Nicholl, M Masson, F Sampson, Mark Elliott, S Crane and DE Newby, on behalf of the 3CPO triallists. A development of a simple risk score to predict early outcome in severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema with acidosis: The 3CPO score. Circulation – Heart Failure. (2010);3:111-117.

Chief Investigator

Professor Alasdair Gray

Director of EMERGE & Consultant in Emergency Medicine

Local PI

Professor Alasdair Gray

Director of EMERGE & Consultant in Emergency Medicine

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