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DEUCE

Start date:
Historic
End date:
July 2012
Co-ordinated by:
NHS Lothian

Is Rotational Thromboelastometry (ROTEM) useful to detect Occult Coagulopathy in the Emergency Department?

Aim

  • To see whether rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) is useful to detect occult coagulopathy in bleeding ED patients.
  • To see what proportion of patients presenting to the ED with bleeding conditions have a coagulopathy on arrival and whether this is sufficient to warrant routine ROTEM use in the ED.
  • To see what proportion of patients presenting to the ED with bleeding conditions develop a coagulopathy during their ED stay, and whether this is sufficient to warrant routine ROTEM use in the ED.
  • To see whether ED staff can be trained to use ROTEM and whether the knowledge is retained.

Trial Design

Single-centre, prospective, observational cohort study,  conducted in the Emergency Department (ED) of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh.

List of Publications – references

Reed MJ, Nimmo AF, McGee D, Manson L, Neffendorf AE, Moir L, Donaldson LS. Rotational thrombolelastometry produces potentially clinical useful results within 10 min in bleeding Emergency Department patients: the DEUCE study. Eur J Emerg Med. 2013; 20(3): 160-6

Chief Investigator

Dr Matt Reed

Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

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