Toggle menu

MRI in Acute Stroke

Start date:
April 2018
End date:
July 2018
Co-ordinated by:
Allan MacRaild
Main trial site:
North Bristol NHS Trust

Strokes caused by a clot are described as ischaemic. When patients experience ischaemic strokes they may be eligible for “clot busting” therapy (thrombolysis). Currently thrombolysis has been shown to improve patient outcome after a stroke if administered within the first 4.5 hours after stroke onset. Up to 25% of patients wake up with symptoms of a stroke. This means they have an unknown onset time for their stroke (so called ‘wake up strokes’). With no known onset time, they are ineligible for thrombolysis. This study will investigate how we might determine stroke onset time.

Our aim is to use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in patients with a known stroke onset time to work out characteristics of particular sequences that would then give us effectively a ‘stroke timer’. Another way to consider this is that with MRI we are trying to work out how much damage has been done to the brain and if any of this damage is still reversible (tissue viability). This has already been done in an animal stroke model. We would then use this data to help estimate the onset time in those patients who had woken up with their symptoms. If we can prove that we can predict time of stroke onset accurately from an MRI scan, we could then consider thrombolysis or other treatments in patients who have woken up with their strokes (this work would form separate research to this study).

Research Team

Allan MacRaild

Stroke Lead Research Nurse

More EMERGE Trials

Molecular and cellular analysis of intracranial tumours

Read more

BRAINED Study

Molecular and cellular analysis of intracranial tumours

ETNA: Edinburgh Transient and Neurological attack: A Cohort Study

Patients frequently present with minor neurological symptoms where a diagnosis of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke is difficult to make positively or to exclude reasonably. For these patients, clinicians are uncertain whether they should: (a) reassure most patients that their symptoms are benign; (b) treat most patients with antiplatelet or other vascular prevention; or (c) stratify stroke risk further using clinical features or brain imaging.
This is important because clinical diagnosis is difficult. Mis-diagnosis is not infrequent and leads to harm from preventable recurrent stroke and costs to health systems from extra care and legal liabilities.
All ETNA participants will receive an MRI scan and the study aims to establish the feasibility and methods for a larger study of diagnostic utility of MR brain imaging and estimate the effects of MRI on clinician decision making.
This study has been recruiting in the Emergency Dept, inpatient wards and TIA clinics since August 2018. We aim to recruit 270 participants and have almost reached our target!

Read more

ETNA

Assisting in identifying patients with Humeral shaft fractures in the ED by screening.

Giving patient information sheets to introduce the study, so patient has had adequate time to read and make decision about going into the trial before going to the fracture clinic.

Read more

HU-FIX Trial