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NoPac

Start date:
May 2017
Co-ordinated by:
Royal Devon & Exeter NHS trust

Patients commonly present to the Emergency Department with epistaxsis (nose bleed). Standard first aid measures such as applying pressure can often stem bleeding however in more severe cases of epistaxsis further treatment is required. These treatments range from the use of vasoconstrictors to cauterisation and eventually to nasal packing.

It is well documented that patients who require nasal packing find this procedure uncomfortable and painful despite its ultimate effectiveness. The NoPac trial is investigating the novel use of tranexamic acid* (TXA) to reduce the need for nasal packing. Recruited participants will receive application of TXA or a placebo before nasal packing is considered. Identifying an effective alternative to this procedure would provide clear patient benefits.

EMERGE hope to commence recruitment to NoPac in spring 2017.

*TXA is a drug that has a good evidence base for the treatment of haemorrhage in trauma. EMERGE is currently involved in two other clinical trials of TXA,
www.emergeresearch.org/trial/halt-it/ www.emergeresearch.org/trial/tich-2/

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Allan MacRaild

Lead Research Nurse

Polly Black

Senior Research Nurse

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