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SALI Study

Start date:
August 2016
End date:
December 2019
Co-ordinated by:
Julia Grahamslaw
Main trial site:
Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh

Aim

This is a study looking at incidence and risk factors for poor ankle functional recovery, and the development and progression of post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis after significant ankle ligament injury.

Trial Design

Longitudinal prospective cohort questionnaire study

Eligibility criteria

Patients of 18 yrs and older, with isolated ankle injuries, who meet the Ottawa Ankle Rules positive (OAR+) criteria (Buffalo modification), but are negative for a significant ankle fracture on subsequent x-ray, will be included in the study.

Local PI

Professor Alasdair Gray

Director of EMERGE & Consultant in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Julia Grahamslaw

Lead Research Nurse

Caroline Blackstock

AMU Senior Research Nurse

Emma Ward

Research Administrator

Hedda Nyhus

Senior Research Nurse

Adam Lloyd

PhD Student & Senior Research Nurse

Allan MacRaild

Lead Research Nurse

Megan McGrath

Senior Research Nurse

Bernadette Gallagher

Senior Research Nurse

Bev Goldberg

AMU Senior Research Nurse

Mia Paderanga

Senior Research Nurse

Alison Grant

Senior Research Nurse

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