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AHEAD

Start date:
Historic
End date:
March 2013
Co-ordinated by:
University of Sheffield

Monitoring anticoagulated patients who suffer head injury

 

Aim

  1. Identify the outcomes of anticoagulated patients attending the ED following head injury
  2. Collect prospective data to enable the risk of serious intracranial pathology to be calculated for this patient group (defined in this study as death or neurosurgery resulting from the initial injury, or Computerised Tomography (CT) scan finding mandating admission or readmission to hospital)
  3. Use baseline and follow up data to identify useful predictors of adverse outcome in this patient group
  4. Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different clinical management strategies for this patient group
  5. Identify important factors in the clinical consultation and assessment process following head injury that may be useful as a diagnostic tool.

Trial Design

Prospective, multi-centre, pragmatic observational cohort study

Chief Investigator

Professor Suzanne Mason

Local PI

Dr. Matt Reed

List of Publications – references

Mason S, Kuczawski M, Teare M, Stevenson M, Holmes M, Ramlakhan S, Goodacr S, Morris F, Harper R: THE AHEAD STUDY: MANAGING ANTICOAGULATED PATIENTS WHO SUFFER HEAD INJURY. Emergency Medicine Journal (2014);31:775

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

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