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COPS

Start date:
30/07/2016
End date:
31/09/2017
Co-ordinated by:
Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh
Main trial site:
RIE

This study contributes to the work of Dr Frank Prior who is developing a tool to be used in the treatment of shock.

It is known that shock creates a set of internal conditions that affect vasculature and that these conditions can vary over time and are dependent on the type of shock. This tool reveals the condition of the vasculature and therefore informs which fluid and drugs are best advised for that patient at that time. The tool is based on patient pore size, Mean Osmotic Pressure (MOP) and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP). As the ability to measure MOP is expensive and rare in the UK, this study is an unique opportunity to investigate if calculating MOP from biochemistry results is accurate by comparing measured and calculated MOP. This is an observational study recruiting 20 healthy volunteers from the orthopaedic pre-assessment clinic. We are very excited about this study as the tool would given clinicians the ability to treat patients with regard to their individual pathophysiology and is therefore in line with a precision medicine based approach.

This study will commence on the 30th May 2016.

Chief Investigator

Dr Gareth Clegg

Senior Lecturer at the University of Edinburgh & Honorary Consultant in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Dr Frank Prior PhD

Pharmacist

Allan MacRaild

Stroke Lead Research Nurse

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