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SNAP40 Study

Start date:
September 2017
End date:
December 2017
Co-ordinated by:
EMERGE
Main trial site:
Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh

SNAP40-ED: Detection of physiological deterioration by the SNAP40 wearable device compared to standard monitoring devices in the Emergency Department.

SNAP40 is a device that monitors vital signs. It is small, portable and has no leads or wires, allowing for patients vital signs to be continuously monitored anywhere in the department. The device is smaller than most mobile phones, and is held within a blue casing attached to an armband (please see image). When fitted to a patient’s arm, the device will continuously monitor their vital signs whilst they are in the Emergency Department.

SNAP40 uses artificial intelligence algorithms to analyse data provided by its sensors in order to recognise indicators of health deterioration. The raw data collected by the sensors is converted into vital signs, which are analysed for signs of deterioration. An alert will be sent to staff if the device detects any signs of deterioration in the patient’s readings.

Funding: SNAP40

Sponsor: SNAP40, Forth Street, Edinburgh (UK)

Setting: This is a single centre study being co-ordinated from Edinburgh.

Chief Investigator

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Polly Black

Senior Research Nurse

Alison Grant

Senior Research Nurse

Mary Morrissey

Senior Research Nurse

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Exciting new trial: SNAP40

Exciting new trial: SNAP40

10 Apr 2017 | Megan McGrath

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