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SECUre – A Multicentre Survey of the Safety of Emergency Care in UK Emergency Departments

Start date:
June 2018
End date:
October 2018

Primary Objective

To provide an overview of safety culture and patient safety issues in UK emergency departments

 

Secondary Objective

To determine if there are any significant differences between doctors and nurses’ perception of safety issues

 

Trial Design

The survey will be undertaken in approximately 15 emergency departments within the UK, both teaching and district general hospitals.

 

Procedure

A research nurse at each study site will randomly select 110 participants to receive a paper copy and an electronic version of the questionnaire and participant information sheet. Participants will have an option of either completing the survey online or posting the paper questionnaire back to the lead study site using a per-paid envelope. A minimum 40% response rate is required but taking part in the study is voluntary.

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Alison Grant

Senior Research Nurse

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