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EHA Study

Start date:
January 2019
End date:
December 2022
Co-ordinated by:
Fiona McCurrach
Main trial site:
RIE, Edinburgh

The study will include all participants with angioedema and participants with previous episodes of abdominal pain of no obvious aetiology.

Hereditary Angioedema Disease (HAE) is a rare inherited disorder characterised by recurrent episodes of the accumulation of fluids outside of the blood vessels, blocking the normal flow of blood or lymphatic fluid and causing rapid swelling of tissues in the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal tract, or airway.

The diagnosis is complicated because HAE is extremely rare and most physicians typically never see a patient with the disorder. In addition, most cases of angioedema are caused by an allergic reaction.

Gastrointestinal, abdominal tract involvement is an important feature and one of the most common in HAE.  Abdominal attacks may be mistaken for conditions such as appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis and ischemic bowel. Often, patients can be misdiagnosed as having psychosomatic symptoms and are inappropriately referred for psychiatric evaluation.

The difficulty in recognizing gastrointestinal symptoms as being related to HAE often leads to a delay in diagnosis and to unnecessary surgical procedures.  .

The detection of HAE through blood sampling will permit early diagnosis and disease activity and progression to be assessed at an early stage and thus ultimately permit better treatment.

Chief Investigator

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Local PI

Dr Matt Reed

Director of EMERGE, Consultant, NRS Career Research Fellow & Honorary Reader in Emergency Medicine

Research Team

Fiona McCurrach

Senior Research Nurse

Julia Grahamslaw

Lead Research Nurse

Emma Moatt

Research Project Manager

Sian Dalgleish

Senior Research Nurse

Claire Cheyne

Senior Research Nurse

Alison Williams

Senior Research Nurse

Rachel O'Brien

Lead Research Nurse

Clare Moceivei

Research Nurse- Bank Staff

Caroline Blackstock

AMU Senior Research Nurse

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