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CERA

Start date:
18/3/2020
Co-ordinated by:
TERN

COVID-19 has recently created a public health emergency and has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. There are serious concerns regarding surge capacity of UK facilities to cope with a pandemic illness and it is conceivable that the psychological, emotional and physical demands placed on an already overstretched workforce may be substantial.

The CERA study aims to understand the evolving and cumulative effects of working during the COVID-19 outbreak on the psychological health of those physicians working in the emergency care settings across the UK.  Physicians will be asked to complete questionnaires on their phones at 3 different time scales; during the Acceleration phase (beginning), during the Peak phase (middle) and during the Deceleration phase (end). It is anticipated that this study will enhance future pandemic preparedness, by highlighting staff resilience and tolerance, and where further support – delivered either during or after an incident – may be beneficial.

The study itself is a TERN project with the support of EMERGE.

Local PI

Research Team

Emma Moatt

Research Project Manager

Emily Godden

Senior Research Nurse - Renal/Acute Medicine

Fraser Craig

Clinical Trial Assistant

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